Stormwater

In this section: Stormwater Hotlines | Engineering| Municipal Separate Storm Permit| Fact Sheets|  Best Management PracticesOther Resources


Stormwater Hotlines

Erosion and Sediment Control Hotline – 717-840-7430
If the stormwater is “cloudy” or “dirty” and originated from an area of active earth disturbance, you will receive the quickest response by calling the York County Conservation District at 717-840-7430. The District investigates all erosion and sediment control concerns for the Township. Please provide your name, address, telephone number where you can be contacted, and the specific location of the origin of the sediment laden runoff.

Illicit Discharge  Hotline – 717-741-3861
New storm water regulations from Pennsylvania’s Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) require that York Township investigate potentially illicit discharges into our streams as well as other events adversely affecting water quality.

If you notice any of the following Notify the Township buy calling our Illicit Discharge  Hotline and/or call 911;

  • Dumping, spills or other illicit (illegal) discharge into storm sewers or streams
  • Sediment leaving a construction site during a rain event (See Erosion and Sediment Control Hotline Above)
  • Observed pollution event or pollutants entering a stream
  • Dry weather flows from outfall pipes into streams (a dry weather flow is water observed flowing out of a pipe when there hasn’t been any rainfall for a period of 72 hours or more)
  • Fish Kills
  • Water Main break

 

Stormwater Management Hotline – 717-741-3861
If the stormwater is “clear” and originated from stable areas where active earth disturbance are not occurring, you will receive the quickest response by calling York Township at 717-741-3861. Please provide your name, address, telephone number where you can be contacted, and the specific location of the origin of the stormwater runoff. Depending upon your description, the Department of Public Works or the Engineering Department will investigate your concern. If the runoff originates from an area of active earth disturbance, the Township will refer it to the York County Conservation District at 717-840-7430.

 



Engineering Department

For more stormwater information see the Engineering Department



National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit (PAG-13) for Discharges from Small Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems (MS4s)

Township Seeks to Comply with Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit (PAG-13) for Discharges from Small Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems (MS4s)

York Township is the owner of a municipal separate storm sewer system (MS4) that discharges to surface waters of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Therefore, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PA-DEP) requires that the Township obtain and comply with the requirements of a NPDES General Permit (PAP-13).

In October, the Township submitted an MS4 Annual Report Form which outlined the Township’s efforts to comply with the NPDES GP-13 requirements from March 10, 2013 through July 31, 2014. To comply The Township followed the PA-DEP’s 6 Minimum Control Measure (MCMs) protocols which included: Public Education and Outreach on Storm Water Impacts, Public Involvement/Participation, Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination, Construction Site Storm Water Runoff Control, Post-Construction Storm Water Management in New Development and Redevelopment, and Pollution Prevention/Good Housekeeping for Municipal Operations.

To see the report select: Current MS4 Annual Report Form

Throughout the coming reporting year, the Township will continue to follow PA-DEP MCM protocols. One such effort will be that Township staff will continue to inspect publicly and privately owned stormwater best management practices (BMPs) within the Township. Township staff will always have photo identification with them while performing inspections.

On September 9, 2012, the Township submitted a Notice of Intent (NOI) for renewed coverage under PAG-13 to the PA-DEP for approval.  On June 25, 2013 the Township received its new permit that allows the Township to discharge stormwater to the Commonwealth.

The Township joined a coalition of municipalities known as the York County Chesapeake Bay Pollution Reduction Plan (YCCBPRP) within York County and developed and submitted a Chesapeake Bay Pollutant Discharge Reduction Plan (CBPRP) to PA-DEP for approval. The CBPRP must included: BMPs that will reduce pollutant loads to the Bay with a schedule for their implementation.

To see the current CBPRP report select:  Current CBPRP Report

To see supporting information that York Township joined the YCCBPRP select:  (MS4 CBPRP)

The Township encourages your participation in events to improve stormwater management, stream protection, and water quality.



Stormwater and Floodplain Management Fact Sheets

  • After the Storm – Environmental Protection Agency 2006 – EPA 841-C-06-001   – After the Storm: Co-Produced by the U.S. EPA and The Weather Channel.  The show highlights three case studies—Santa Monica Bay, the Mississippi River Basin/Gulf of Mexico, and New York City—where  polluted runoff threatens watersheds highly valued for recreation,  commercial fisheries and navigation, and drinking water. Key scientists and water quality experts, and citizens involved in local and national  watershed protection efforts provide insight into the problems as well as solutions to today’s water quality challenges. After the Storm also explains simple things people can do to protect their local watershed-such as picking up after one’s dog, recycling household  hazardous wastes, and conserving water. The program is intended for educational and communication purposes in classrooms, conferences,   etc.
    View After the Storm Video on YouTube
  • Floodplain Management Is Good For Your Budget- PHILADELPHIA, Pa. — As the spring flooding season approaches, the Region III office of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) reminds everyone to include a key ingredient in their household’s  flood safety plan—flood insurance. Flooding is the most costly disaster in the United States. Common flooding misconceptions, oversights and myths can lead to (or compound) disaster. As such, the following are a few myths FEMA wants to dispel in its ongoing effort to help protect lives and property:
    View additional Floodplain Management Information
  • Lawn Fertilizers, Herbicides, & Pesticides – Fertilizers applied at the wrong times or at excessive rates: are washed off lawns by rain storms, are carried by storm flows along streets and through stormwater pipes, are discharged into streams, and find their way into the Chesapeake Bay. In the Bay those fertilizers promote algae growth, depleting oxygen, and killing fish, crabs, and other aquatic life. For more information select the following link.
    Link to: Lawns & Fertilizers 04-25-13
  • Low Impact Design (LID) Brings Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs) Curbside  – Select the following link for information on Low Impact Design (LID) Brings Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs) Curbside. Call the Engineering Office at the township administration office for additional information regarding LID’s.
    Link to: Low-Impact-Design-Curbside.pdf
  • On-Lot Septic Systems & Their Operation & Maintenance- A presentation of “This OLDS House” was made for home owners with on-lot sanitary sewage systems. This program was presented by the York County Conservation District, Penn State and Young’s Sanitary Septic Services. As a follow-up to this presentation please see the link below for program information: Link to  information: SEPTIC SYSTEMS
  • Pervious Pavement: A different way to manage stormwater –Pennsylvania’s stormwater management regulations and the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Program changed how we are required to manage stormwater. The attached article introduces Pervious Pavement as one of a type of stormwater management facilities (Best Management Practices, BMPs) that one may see being installed. Link about Pervious Pavement
  • Rain Gardens: A different way to manage stormwater – Pennsylvania’s stormwater management regulations and the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Program changed how we are required to manage stormwater. The attached article introduces Rain Gardens as one of a type of stormwater management facilities (Best Management Practices, BMPs) that one may see being installed. Link to: Rain Gardens
  • Restaurants & Food Services:  Good Cleaning & Water Quality Practices  – CLEAN STREAMS are important to York Township. Food wastes, fats, greases, and oils from restaurants and food service facilities can cause sanitary sewer line blockages that may result in sewage overflows into your restaurant or food service facility. Also, food wastes, fats, greases, and oils that are poured or hosed onto paved areas and streets or into gutters or storm drains pollute our streams.Link about Restaraunts Food Services – Good Cleaning WQ Practices
  • US EPA  Hazardous Materials Storage  Please see the link below for information on EPA’sHazardous Materials Storage facts:Link to information: EPA Hazardous Materials Storage
  • US EPA  Materials Management – Please see the link below for information on EPA’s Material Management facts: Link to information: EPA Materials Management
  • US EPA  Protecting Water Quality from Urban Runoff  – In urban and suburban areas, much of the land surface is covered by buildings and pavement, which do not allow rain and snowmelt to soak into the ground. Instead, most developed areas rely on storm drains to carry large amounts of runoff from roofs and paved areas to nearby waterways. The stormwater runoff carries pollutants such as oil, dirt, chemicals, and lawn fertilizers directly to streams and rivers, where they seriously harm water quality.Link about Protecting Water Quality from Urban Runoff

 


Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs) Details and Notes

Links to detailed BMP information can be viewed on the Engineering Department page.


Other Resource Links & Downloadable Information